Money Monster (2016) – 4/5


With an original story and powerful performances, Money Monster gets everyone’s attention as soon as it starts, but time doesn’t seem to be this movie’s friend since redundancy and predictability become pronounced soon after. Successfully executed for the most part, it seems director Jodie Foster is slowly but surely pushing her way into her directing ambition.

Money Monster revolves around Lee Gates (George Clooney), a TV host who gives advise about economy and Wall Street, until one day, a bankrupt viewer (Jack O’Connell) who lost all of his money listening to his advice, sneaks to his show, takes everyone hostage, and questions him about how and why that happened. The film moves at a quick, Wall Street-like kind of pace, which is to be expected. There is no doubt George Clooney, Julia Roberts, and Jack O’Connell do an amazing job, it is easy to believe their fear and anxiety. But is is hard to believe anyone is truly in danger after the countless attempts and threats continuously and repeatedly shown throughout the movie.

As mentioned before, Jodie Foster surpassed everyone’s expectations with this movie, but the storytelling lacked a few elements. While the story was good, it sometimes tried too hard to appeal to the Hollywood vibe. Without spoiling too much, I will say that bringing out countless troops and policeman to surround a building and follow two people along the streets of New York was a little too much. That much action was unnecessary for a thriller like this.

There seems to be a hype in the movie industry about the Wall Street rigged and corrupt system and Money Monster gets this point across incredibly well: The poor keep loosing while the rich keep winning. The movie starts out perfectly but becomes predictable and repetitive after that, deescalating slowly until you arrive to an unhappy, but satisfying conclusion. All in all, Money Monster is a worthwhile trip to the movie theater, with a few nonessential glossy scenes here and there.

Learn more about the movie here: Rotten Tomatoes

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